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The Least of These

Proverbs 22:6 (ESV)
6Train up a child in the way he should go;
even when he is old he will not depart from it.

Zakhqurey Price is an 11 year old Arkansas boy who has been diagnosed with autism, among other things. Despite documentation of his diagnosis his school district refused to provide this child with appropriate services. If you thought this sounded like a recipe for disaster for this child you would be right.

Fifth grade autistic boy charged with a felony
On Oct 30th, Zakhqurey exhibited behaviors manifested by his Autism, which led to restraints. The police were called. In the process of attempting to restrain him, two staff members were injured and filed felony charges against the 11 year old child. They cornered him and tried to take him down, he fought back. There were very minor injuries to principal and teacher. The fifth grader was taken away in handcuffs and booked with juvenile criminals. He has an IQ of 68.


What does it teach this child when those tasked with educating him ignore information vital to doing their jobs? What does it teach this child when those seem people seem so intent on not doing their jobs at all? What does it teach this child that these adults are so willing to write him off and treat him like a criminal? What does it teach this child when those with power and influence choose to spread disinformation about him and his family (as documented here) rather than seek to do what is right, proper and required by law?

Many others have been following Zakhquery's situation, providing more information and exposing this abuse to the light of day.



The thing about Zakhquery Price is that his situation is not unique and the more I read it about it the more I think, there but for the grace of God go I. We can't keep letting things like this happen to our children and adults with disabilities.
Matthew 25:35-40 (ESV)
35For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, 36I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.' 37Then the righteous will answer him, saying, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? 38And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? 39And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?' 40And the King will answer them, 'Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.'

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