More at the Evangelical Outpost on "The Passion"

The Passion of Apostates (Part II): The Hugh Hewitt Connection, note the striking difference between how Mr. Hewitt is described and how Rev. Stanger is described.
Right-wing Christian ideologue and media pundit Hugh Hewitt is repaying actor/director Mel Gibson with lavish praise for the invitation he got to one of Gibson's exclusive pre-screenings of the controversial forthcoming film "The Passion of the Christ."

[Finally, someone had the courage to stand up and expose Hugh’s true colors. After hearing all this talk about him being a “center-right” blogger I’m glad someone pointed out the truth – he’s a media pundit. I mean, really, one post a day does not a blogger make.]

Gibson has tried to keep his production hermetically sealed for months, shutting out mainstream Christian, Jewish and interfaith leaders from screenings. But based on a leaked version of the script, many of those religious leaders are deeply concerned that the film will unleash a wave of anti-Semitism -- an accusation Gibson has forcefully rejected. Hewitt clearly anticipates the severe criticism that the film is likely to draw upon release, and he's giving Gibson a resounding thumbs up.

[Hugh was also “leaked” a pre-script version of the plot which he passed along to some of his favorite bloggers. Actually, it appears that there were four different scriptdoctors working on the story. The names of the writers are only identified by their first names – Matthew, Mark, Luke, John (I know Mel is all about secrecy but I don’t know how that’s going to fly with the Screenwriter’s Guild). Talk about anti-Semitic! The main character, Jesus, seems to be all right. But the twelve guys he has working with him are a bunch of bumbling idiots. They are always screwing up and getting confused…it really reflects poorly on the Jews.]
Some links:
"The Passion of Christ", I think this is the official site. This one is the fan website.

Comments

Popular Posts

The Racist Nature of Cotton Balls

Theology quiz

Raï: Algerian blues and protest music