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September 11, 2001, Do You Remember?



Over the weekend a flier from a local furniture store came in the mail. It seems that they will be having a big clearance sale on September 11 this year. I know Americans have a habit of thoroughly commercializing every holiday and every day of remembrance but isn't it a bit early to be doing this to 9/11? I'm really not interested in remembering those who died that day buy going on a shopping spree. Are you?

As I searched for images to include in this post I became unexpectedly emotional. The photo of Father Mychal Judge's body being carried away from ground zero had me sobbing as if I were watching the towers fall for the first time.

Father Judge "Out of the wreckage of the south tower, first responders carry the body of Father Mychal Judge, the FDNY chaplain, to St. Peter’s Church. (Photograph by Shannon Stapleton / Reuters)"

I have always found photos of those running to the scene to help and those working to save lives that day and the crater in the earth that is all that is left of United flight 93 most moving.

WTC Photo Gallery











The Pentagon,
September 11, 2001 Images and Time Line







Shanksville, Flight 93 Photos

Comments

  1. I truly believe that Father Mychal Judge was one of the first to die so that he could meet and guide those who followed to the other side.

    Most of us first heard of Father Mychal, the FDNY chaplain and "the saint of 9/11", from that iconic photo of his body being carried from Ground Zero.

    Yet even prior to his heroic death on 9/11, Father Mychal was widely seen by many New Yorkers as a living saint for his deep spirituality and his extraordinary work not only with firefighters -- but with the homeless, recovering alcoholics, people with AIDS, immigrants, gays and lesbians, and others rejected by society.

    This often annoyed the church hierarchy. But like his spiritual father St. Francis of Assisi, Mychal reported directly to a Higher Authority, as evidenced by several miraculous healings through him.

    For more prayerful inspiration about Father Mychal, I invite you to visit:

    http://SaintMychalJudge.blogspot.com

    God bless,
    John M. Kelley
    aka "Mychals Prayer"

    ReplyDelete
  2. Those are some powerful images. Thank you very much for taking time to share them.

    I came across your blog from reading a paper on "Black Bloggers". Are you aware of recent efforts to create The AfroSpear?

    peace, Villager

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just Came across your blog, your pictures of 9/11 are very moving cant believe a furniture store was trying to advertise using 9/11, the father Mychal pic especially makes me cry everytime I see it.was shopping in Waterford Crystal the other day in Waterford itself & in the store they had the Tribute Piece to Father Mychal & the firemen who carried him out.you have probably seen it already im sure but just wanted share in case you didnt. http://seaneganartglass.com/911.html

    ReplyDelete

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