What Are They Doing With The Church People's Money?

Cross posted at Say Anything: Reader blogs.


Whatever they've been doing with it they are starting to get noticed by the government, Senator Probes Megachurches' Finances. I imagine some folk are mighty uncomfortable with the light that's about to hit their lives.
Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA), ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee, expects responses this week from half a dozen of the country's largest churches to questions about their finances.

Grassley has taken on megachurches, where millions of dollars are raised with little oversight. In letters that Grassley sent to the churches last month, he wonders whether the lavish lifestyles of the ministers violate the churches' tax-exempt status.

Before anyone gets too giddy with claims of religious persecution remember that the Bible calls all members of the Body of Christ (aka Christians everywhere and everywhen for those who don't speak the Christianese too good), including the leaders of megachurches, to be above reproach. Meaning, you shouldn't give anyone any excuse to question the appropriateness of your behaviour.
Some ministers have questioned the investigation. Bishop Eddie Long called it unjust and an attack on religious freedom and property rights. Long declined to talk further.

Taking people's money and using it inappropriately is not a religious right or freedom. Not in Christianity anyway. The financial dealings of these places should be wide open for anyone who wants to take a look. If you start crying foul because someone has asked what you did with all of the money you've been taking from people then it just makes one wonder just what you're trying to hide. Lack of transparency and oversight always breeds corruption. We've seen plenty of people, religious and otherwise, crash and burn because they thought themselves too important or too "blessed" to follow the rules and be accountable to anyone.

Here's to a good thrashing of the *money changers in the temple.



*Money changers=folk who were making profit off of the people who went to worship.

Comments

  1. If a church isn't willing to open books to anyone at anytime, no matter the size, they are suspect.

    However, I think there is good reason to protest the move.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts

The Racist Nature of Cotton Balls

Theology quiz

Raï: Algerian blues and protest music